Virginia Wine Time

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Category: Holidays (page 2 of 5)

Holiday Wines at Rappahannock Cellars

Time for more holiday menus, and this time it’s Christmas parties and dinners. Of course, that means celebrating with the perfect Virginia wines. Our recent visit to Rappahannock Cellars presented a few options.
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2011 Viogner from Ducard Vineyard: Newly released on the day of our visit to Rappahannock Cellars, this aromatic wine with its honeysuckle notes and soft peach flavors would be a natural pairing with roasted turkey.

2011 Noblesse Rouge: I really enjoyed this one. A blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, and Petit Verdot, this accessible red wine with its raspberry and blackberry flavors should prove quite the partner with pork roast.
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2010 Meritage: Bold!! Of course, this Bordeaux-style blend is from the very warm and dry 2010 vintage, and tasters may want to buy now but drink later. However, if you plan to serve up a rib roast for the holidays, consider this one; however, decant before pouring. Aromas and flavors include blackberry, dark cherry, and spice with a whiff of tobacco to boot.

2011 Rose: Ham is always a favorite this time of year, so consider the 2011 Rose. Paul liked this one a lot and he seemed to enjoy the fizzy mouth presence. It was a bit odd for me, though, since this is not a sparkling wine. However, I do think it would work well salty smoked ham that has been spiked with cloves and glazed with honey. Cranberry sauce on the side, of course!

Solera: Sugared pecans, dried fruit, and blue cheeses for dessert? Solera might be the dessert wine to offer guests. This sherry-like wine is made from Vidal Blanc grapes and presents aromas of honey, nuts, and orange peel.
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We made certain to purchase our favorite wines for the holidays once our tasting concluded. Be sure to pay a visit to Rapahannock Cellars to find your own holiday favorites, and be sure to mention that Virginia Wine Time sent you.

Thanksgiving with Virginia Wines

Pour Virginia Wines for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving season is upon us, and there is no greater need for versatile wines than Thanksgiving dinner. Deciding what to pour can be as challenging as deciding what to serve especially if dinner guests have different food and wine palates. Turkey seems to be the meat of choice, but it’s the sides that vary and hence the wine offerings. Some like mashed potatoes but others prefer oyster dressing; some like sweeter white wines while others crave a red wine with the meal. We can’t help you cook dinner, but we can make a couple of suggestions for wine pairings that might make these weighty decisions seem a little lighter!

We were out in wine country in northern Virginia this past weekend, and we sampled some wines that should provide readers with some choices for the upcoming holiday.

Chester Gap Cellars: Winemaker Bernd Jung has to be one of the few (if not only) Virginia winemakers to grow the Roussanne grape, a white varietal grown in Rhone region of France. The 2010 Roussanne might be an option if the meal will begin with either seafood bisque or feature a creamy sauce with the main meal. Aged for fifteen months in French oak barrels, the 2010 Roussanne exhibits tropical fruit characteristics. It is a bit higher in alcohol, so pair with something that can stand up to it. My own preference is the earthy 2009 Petit Verdot aged for two years in French oak barrels. Aromas of ripe dark plums and flavors of dark fruit and berries should complement dishes that are heavy on herbs and spices; non-traditionalists who opt to serve duck or game meats instead of turkey should consider this one.



Glen Manor Vineyards: Governor’s Cup winner Jeff White is now featuring 2011 wines on his tasting room menu. The four wines that we sampled would all have a place on the Thanksgiving Day table; of course, all of the wines were well-crafted. Serving shellfish before the main course? Can’t go wrong with the classic 2011 Sauvignon Blanc with its elements of grass, citrus and mineral that are characteristic of the varietal. White wine lovers who don’t drink reds? Red wine lovers who don’t drink whites? Offer the 2011 Rose with its aromas of red berries and fresh mint. This one can be served with just about anything on the menu. A nice acidity makes this rose refreshing (and it’s not sweet!) The 2011 harvest was considered quite challenging, but Jeff White has managed to produce excellent red wines from this tricky vintage. There was nothing wimpy about the weighty 2011 Cabernet Franc and its notes of dark cherry, cranberry and menthol. This would be my go-to wine for the main meal on Turkey Day especially if sides included cornbread dressing and fresh cranberry sauce. Going for beef stew instead of poultry? Try the 2011 Vin Rouge, a blend that is dominated by Cabernet Sauvignon (50%) and complemented by Petit Verdot (36%), and Merlot (14%). Smoky notes give way to aromas of plum, licorice and spice.



Still confused as to which wines to pour? I always recommend opening more than one bottle of wine for Thanksgiving dinner and then let guests decide which glass to sip with the meal. This option encourages guests to sample a few wines instead of only one. Who knows what will happen—that white wine lover may fall in love with a Virginia red wine!

We will post one more article about wine Thanksgiving wine options featuring two more Virginia wineries. Check in later for that one! In the meantime, be sure to try these wines at Chester Gap Cellars and Glen Manor Vineyards, and mention that Virginia Wine Time sent you.

Think Local For A Summer Getaway

“We view ourselves as a wine country destination.”
Neal Wavra, Innkeeper and sommelier at Ashby Inn and Restaurant

Summer usually means vacation time for most of us; however, gas prices may have thrown a wrench into summer travel plans. Why not consider a trip to more local destinations? The Piedmont area has much to offer including historical sites, postcard-perfect landscapes, and award winning wineries. Plan to stay at a local inn to complete the getaway experience.

Ashby Inn and Restaurant
Vacationers who wish to focus on the museums, monuments, and other historic sites of the nation’s capital yet retreat to a more peaceful rural setting in the evenings may want to consider The Ashby Inn and Restaurant. The Ashby Inn and Restaurant is located in Paris, Virginia and about an hour from Washington DC. It includes ten guest accommodations and offers a view of Paris Mountain, Ashby Gap and Sky Meadow State Park. The building itself was established in 1829, and the inn’s rooms are furnished with period furnishings and antiques. Innkeepers Neal and Star Wavra also operate a restaurant on the property with Neal serving not only as the innkeeper but also the sommelier. While chef Tarver King serves up such delectable fare as popcorn sweetbreads, rockfish seviche and smoked beef rib loin, Neal stocks the wine cellar with an impressive international collection that includes Virginia wines. In fact, a sample dinner menu included a pairing of crab cakes with a viognier from Chester Gap Cellars, the rockfish seviche with a sauvignon blanc from Linden Vineyards, the smoked beef rib loin with a meritage from Glen Manor Vineyards, and a cheese plate partnered with a pear wine from Fabbioli Cellars.

Neal and Star Wavra opt to include local wines on the wine list because they are “distinctive and delicious. Why would any Virginia restaurant not have at least some wine selections from here?” Neal describes Virginia wines as “approachable” with a fruit expression similar to California’s but with more moderate alcohol levels and brighter acidity. Therefore, he finds Virginia wines to be food friendly.

The Ashby Inn and Restaurant is also located near award winning wineries, and museum-weary travelers may wish to take a break from the touristy mayhem and relax with a favorite bottle of Virginia wine. Nearby wineries include Delaplane Cellars, Linden Vineyards, Chester Gap Cellars, and Barrel Oak Winery.

Inn at Meander Plantation
The Monticello area also offers historic landmarks such as Thomas Jefferson’s home, Monticello, as well as the homes of other early presidents such as James Madison and James Monroe. Monticello was also the site of Jefferson’s failed experiments with winemaking. However, Jefferson would be quite pleased with the quality of wines now being produced in this area. Therefore, summer travelers who wish to explore these more distant colonial landmarks may want to factor in a tour of Monticello’s acclaimed wineries. Where to stay? Try the historic Inn at Meander Plantation.

A member of Virginia’s House of Burgesses established plantation in 1726, but at the time it was named Elim. In fact, Thomas Jefferson, winemaker and future president, was a guest at the home. The plantation was later renamed after an adjacent river, the Meander. Meander eventually fell into disrepair and was even slated for demolition; however, current owners Suzie Blanchard and Suzanne Thomas bought the Meander property in 1991 and restored it with a renewed purpose—to operate a country inn that captured the charm and history of colonial and post-colonial America.

In addition to their duties as innkeepers, Suzie and Suzanne also don chef’s hats to prepare a multi-course dining experience with a Virginia wine accompanying each course. Hoping for a bottle of California chardonnay instead? Not at the Inn at Meander Plantation. Suzanne explained that a decision to support the local wine industry was made at the beginning because “it was the right thing to do.” She and Suzie saw the potential of Virginia wine early on and have marveled at the industry’s growth in size and quality over the past two decades. Suzie and Suzanne also conduct a semi-monthly Virginia Wine Academy at the Inn.

The Monticello area is also home to some of the best wineries and winemaking talent in the state. These include (but by no means limited to) Barboursville Vineyards, Blenheim Vineyards, Jefferson Vineyards, Keswick Vineyards, King Family Estate, and Pollak Vineyards.

Sharp Rock Inn
Work-weary vacationers may simply want to get away from it all and not be concerned with mobs of tourists at museums or monuments. Virginia wine country can come to the rescue! This kind of vacationer may want to consider a stay at Sharp Rock Inn bed and breakfast; as an added bonus, the Inn also functions as a working vineyard and winery. Sharp Rock Inn is situated adjacent to the ever-babbling Hughes River and offers a stunning view of Old Rag Mountain. The Inn once functioned as a farm in the late 1700s, and owners Jimm and Kathy East renovated the property and its structures to offer charming accommodations as well as a quaint tasting room.

Jimm opened the Sharp Rock winery in 1998 with a commitment to produce small quantities of quality wines. All Sharp Rock wines are produced from grapes grown on his 25-acre property, and these include sauvignon blanc and chardonnay as well as the red Bordeaux varieties such as cabernet franc, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, malbec, and petit verdot. Jimm East’s wines earn numerous national and international awards; however, the most prized accolades come from guests who give the Sharp Rock Inn and its wines rave reviews.

Nature lovers may want to pack a pair of hiking boots for scenic walks on nearby nature trails. Hoping to avoid exercise? Plan to unwind with a favorite book and a glass of Sharp Rock wine to enjoy besides the soothing rush of the Hughes River. Hoping to extend the wine tasting experience? Several other heralded wineries are close by and include Gadino Cellars, Rappahanock Cellars, and Gray Ghost Vineyards.

Historical sites, mountain landscapes, and award-winning wineries are only a short trip away. Use these recommendations to plan a nearby (and affordable) summer getaway that is certain to provide memorable moments.

This article appeared in the Summer 2012 edition of the Piedmont Virginian magazine.

Happy Holidays!

We hope everyone is enjoying the holidays with lots of Virginia wine! We’ll be taking this week off to be with family and enjoy the holidays as well. Enjoy the holidays and Happy New Year, too!

Virginia Wine For The Holidays

Yes, it is the holiday season, and readers may have noticed that we have not been on the wines trails. Holiday fun and mayhem have left little time for weekend treks to the wineries; however, rest assured that we have been enjoying Virginia wines whenever possible.

We always enjoy holiday movies at this time of year, and a recent holiday film night featured two favorites, The Bishops Wife and Christmas in Connecticut. What wines to enjoy with these seasonal classics? With a nice chunk of manchego cheese on the chopping block, we poured the 2008 Claret from Linden. It offered notes of dark fruit and dried herbs with similar flavors. Medium bodied, it finished with a splash of vanilla. Easy to drink, it was perfect with the gaminess of the manchego cheese. By the time we sipped through this one, Dudley the Angel turned the sour Agnes Hamilton into an angel herself, and Santa brought Elizabeth Lane a handsome soldier who used the old Magoo to charm the ladies.

Virginia wines are always on the menu when we have friends over for dinner, and this past weekend we poured the 2009 Rose from Linden. (Yes, Linden again, but who can blame us?) Crisp with grapefruit notes and flavors of strawberry and citrus, it proved to be a versatile pour that paired well with a salad of marinated roasted beets, orange slices and chives.

And imagine our pleasant surprise when our friends, Dorothy and Laura, brought us a bottle of wine to enjoy with dinner. Their wine of choice? The 2008 Cabernet Sauvignon from Barboursville Vineyards. Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus, and he regularly delivers Virginia wines to good boys and girls. (Well, good friends sometimes are the Santas, and they have the good taste to give Virginia wines as gifts!)

We hope that readers are enjoying this holiday season, and we know that favorite Virginia wines are being poured. It is not too late to visit these Virginia wineries before Christmas, but time is running out. If you do plan to make a visit, mention that Virginia Wine Time sent you.

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